Faculty Profile

Jennifer Moore

Title
Associate Professor
Department
Information Science
College
College of Information

    

Education

PhD, University of Texas, 2011.
Major: Information Studies
Degree Specialization: Youth services
Dissertation Title: The Role of High School Librarian as Sexual Health Information Providers: Perceptions from Two Social Systems
MS, University of Texas, 2005.
Major: Information Studies
Degree Specialization: School Librarianship
BA, University of Texas, 1999.
Major: English

Current Scheduled Teaching*

INFO 5420.001, Literature for Youth, Spring 2022
INFO 5345.001, School Library Program Development, Spring 2022
INFO 6900.711, Special Problems, Spring 2022

* Texas Education Code 51.974 (HB 2504) requires each institution of higher education to make available to the public, a syllabus for undergraduate lecture courses offered for credit by the institution.

Previous Scheduled Teaching*

INFO 5420.001, Literature for Youth, Fall 2021 Syllabus SPOT
INFO 5420.005, Literature for Youth, Fall 2021 Syllabus SPOT
INFO 5345.001, School Library Program Development, Fall 2021 Syllabus SPOT
INFO 5345.005, School Library Program Development, Fall 2021 Syllabus SPOT
INFO 5345.001, School Library Program Development, Summer 10W 2021 Syllabus
INFO 5345.005, School Library Program Development, Summer 10W 2021 Syllabus
INFO 5345.001, School Library Program Development, Spring 2021 Syllabus SPOT
INFO 5345.005, School Library Program Development, Spring 2021 Syllabus SPOT

* Texas Education Code 51.974 (HB 2504) requires each institution of higher education to make available to the public, a syllabus for undergraduate lecture courses offered for credit by the institution.

Published Publications

Published Intellectual Contributions

AASL Knowledge Question Journal Blog Post
Moore, J., Bartley, E., Hernandez, V., Williams, A. (2019). Computational thinking in your school library. Knowledge Quest. American Association of School Librarians. https://knowledgequest.aasl.org/computational-thinking-in-your-school-library/
Abstracts and Proceedings
Marino, J., Moore, J., Evans, S., Schultz-Jones, B. (2019). A Design Approach to a Wicked Problem: Designing Data Literacy Leadership Services for Librarians. Urbana–Champaign, Illinois: University of Illinois. https://www.ideals.illinois.edu/handle/2142/103341
Conference Proceeding
DiScala, J., Moore, J., Cahill, M. (2021). Evidence-based practice and school librarians: Analyses of practitioners’ data collection. Association of Library and Information Science Educators.
Moore, J., Tudor, A., Sanchez, J. (2021). Weaving a storytelling tapestry using computational thinking. International Association for School Librarianship.
Sanchez, J., Moore, J., Visser, M. (2020). A national forum on computational thinking: Three learning modules for pre-service graduate educators. Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education.
Marino, J., Schultz-Jones, B., Moore, J., Smith, D. L., Elkins, A. (2019). Data Literacy: School Librarians as Data Coaches. Edmonton, Alberta: International Association for School Librarianship. https://journals.library.ualberta.ca/slw/index.php/iasl/article/view/7390
Marino, J., Evans, S., Moore, J., Smith, D. L., Schultz-Jones, B., Elkins, A. (2019). Preparing library professionals for data literacy leadership: Administrator perspectives. Chicago, Illinois: Association of Library and Information Science Education. https://www.ideals.illinois.edu/handle/2142/105330
Schultz-Jones, B., Moore, J., Marino, J. (2019). Data Literacy Leadership Preparation for School Librarians. The Hague: IFLA. http://library.ifla.org/2545/
Moore, J., Elkins, A., Boelens, H. (2017). Libraries on the move: By land, by sea, and by air.
Journal Article
Greene-Taylor,, Moore, J., Visser, M., Drouillard, C. (2018). Incorporating computational thinking into library graduate course goals and objectives. 21, . http://www.ala.org/aasl/sites/ala.org.aasl/files/content/aaslpubsandjournals/slr/vol21/SLR_IncorporatingComputationalThinking_V21.pdf
Moore, J., Cahill, M. (2017). A sound history. Children and Libraries.
Moore, J., Cahill, M. (2016). Audiobooks: Legitimate “reading” material for adolescents?. School Library Research. http://www.ala.org/aasl/sites/ala.org.aasl/files/content/aaslpubsandjournals/slr/vol19/SLR_AudiobooksLegitimateReading_V19.pdf

Awarded Grants

Contracts, Grants and Sponsored Research

Fellowship
Moore, J. (Other), "Libraries Ready to Code, Phase II," Sponsored by American Library Association and Google Partnership, Other, $1500 Funded. (April 2, 2017December 2017).
Grant - Research
Smith, D. L. (Principal), Tyler-Wood, T. L. (Co-Principal), Zhang, X. (Co-Principal), Kuon, T. (Supporting), Evans, S. (Supporting), Schultz-Jones, B. (Supporting), Moore, J. (Supporting), "School librarians facilitating the success of English language learners," Sponsored by Institute for Museum and Library Science (IMLS), Federal, $132893 Funded. (September 2021August 2023).
Moore, J. E. (Co-Principal), Sanchez, J. (Co-Principal), "Integrating Computational Thinking into LIS Youth Services Courses," Sponsored by Institute of Museum and Library Services, Federal, $150000 Funded. (September 1, 2019August 31, 2021).
Moore, J. (Principal), "The school library as a sexual health learning environment," Sponsored by Texas Woman's University College of Professional Education Dean’s Research Award, Other, $1000 Funded. (January 1, 2013December 31, 2013).
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Overall
Summative Rating
Challenge and
Engagement Index
Response Rate

out of 5

out of 7
%
of
students responded
  • Overall Summative Rating (median):
    This rating represents the combined responses of students to the four global summative items and is presented to provide an overall index of the class’s quality. Overall summative statements include the following (response options include a Likert scale ranging from 5 = Excellent, 3 = Good, and 1= Very poor):
    • The course as a whole was
    • The course content was
    • The instructor’s contribution to the course was
    • The instructor’s effectiveness in teaching the subject matter was
  • Challenge and Engagement Index:
    This rating combines student responses to several SPOT items relating to how academically challenging students found the course to be and how engaged they were. Challenge and Engagement Index items include the following (response options include a Likert scale ranging from 7 = Much higher, 4 = Average, and 1 = Much lower):
    • Do you expect your grade in this course to be
    • The intellectual challenge presented was
    • The amount of effort you put into this course was
    • The amount of effort to succeed in this course was
    • Your involvement in course (doing assignments, attending classes, etc.) was
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